Learning & the Brain 45: Engaged, Empowered Minds (LATB45)

Organization: Public Information Resources, Inc.

Venue: The Westin Copley Place

Location: Boston, Massachusetts, United States

Event Date/Time: Nov 17, 2016 / 1:00 pm - (EST) End Date/Time: Nov 19, 2016 / 3:30 pm - (EST)
Registration Date: Nov 04, 2016 Time: 18:00:00 - (EST)
Early Registration Date: Sep 30, 2016 Time: 18:00:00 - (EST)
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Description

Deeper, critical thinking and problem solving skills are required for ESSA and essential for the 21st Century. But when it comes to academic and thinking skills, it is not just intelligence and grit that make the difference – but student ethics, engagement and empowerment. Cognitive and developmental science research shown that students who are more actively involved in extracurricular, community-based activities, social causes and solving real-world problems are more engaged in school, more empathetic, feel more empowered and are more likely to become active citizens. Learn how to increase student thinking, engagement and empowerment through greater student autonomy, choice, voice, purpose, passion, interest, real-world problem solving, social justice and social/community service. By moving away from high stakes testing and toward student empowerment and character, we can create the engaged, ethical students and citizens we need to change the world.

 

Topics Include:

  • Increasing Critical Thinking
  • The Science of Empowerment
  • Engaging Student Motivation
  • Supporting Student Voice/Choice
  • Applying Brain Science to School
  • The Brain, Ethics and Empathy
  • Advocating Active Citizenship
  • Boosting Brains for Thinking
  • Teaching Character and Civics
  • Promoting World Problem Solving
  • Raising Reason, Civility and Respect
  • Benefits of Social/Community Action
  • Ways to Promote Youth Participation
  • Motivating Minds with Social Change
  • Igniting Interest, Passion and Purpose
  • Civic Education and Digital Citizens
  • Critical Thinking in Writing & STEM

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

You will gain knowledge about:

✓  The science of student empowerment and intrinsic motivation

✓  Linking engaged learning, purpose and service to achievement

✓  Enabling students to be global, civic and community innovators

✓  Using real-world problem solving, inquiry and critical thinking

✓  Empowering students to express their voices and change the world

✓  Encouraging 21st Century skills, social change and entrepreneurship

✓  Promoting excellence, ethics, character, civility and collaborations

✓  Providing students with choices, interest and ownership in learning

✓  Teaching civic education, community service and citizen science

✓  Helping students become critical, reflective and ethical thinkers

✓  Promoting youth development with global and digital citizenship

✓  Developing deeper thinking in reading, writing and STEM learning

 

Venue

10 Huntington Avenue
Boston
Massachusetts
United States
MORE INFO ON THIS VENUE

Organizations

Public Information Resources, Inc.
35 Highland Circle, 1st Floot
Needham
Massachusetts
02494
United States

Conference Speakers

Ron Berger, MEd, Chief Program Officer, Expeditionary Learning Schools; Author, An Ethic of Excellence (2003); Co-Author, Learning That Lasts (2016), Leaders of Their Own Learning: Transforming Schools Through Student-Engaged Assessment (2014), and Transformational Literacy: Making the Common Core Shift with Work That Matters (2014)

Sandra B. Chapman, PhD, Founder and Chief Director of the Center for Brain health; Dee Wyly Distinguished Chair in Brain Health; Professor, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas; Co-Author, Make Your Brain Smarter: Increase Your Brain's Creativity, Energy and Focus (2013) and " Higher-order strategic gist reasoning in adolescence" (2013, The Adolescent Brain: Learning, Reasoning and Decision-Making)

William Damon, PhD, Director, Stanford Center on Adolescence; Professor of Education, Stanford University; Author, Failing Liberty 101: How We Are Leaving Young Americans Unprepared for Citizenship in a Free Society (2011), The Path to Purpose: How Young People Find Their Calling in Life (2009) and Moral Child (2008); Co-Author, The Power of Ideals: The Real Story of Moral Choice (2015)

John D. E. Gabrieli, PhD; Grover Hermann Professor in Health Sciences and Technology; Professor of Brain and Cognitive Sciences; Co-Director, Clinical Research Center; Associate Director, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; co-author of “Emotion enhances remembrance of neutral events past” (2006, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences) and “Educating the human brain: Lessons from brain imaging” (2002, EduCause)

Howard E. Gardner, PhD, John H. and Elizabeth A. Hobbs Professor of Cognition and Education, Harvard Graduate School of Education; Author, The Unschooled Mind (2011, 2nd edition) and Multiple Intelligences (2006); Co-Author, The App Generation (2013) and Good Work: When Excellence and Ethics Meet (2002)

Joshua D. Greene, PhD, Professor of Psychology and Director, Moral Cognition Lab, Harvard University; Author, Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason and the Gap Between Us and Them (2013)

Bryan K. Harris, EdD,Director of Professional Development and Public Relations, Casa Grande Elementary School District; Educational Consultant; Author, Creating a Classroom Culture That Supports the Common Core: Teaching Questioning, Conversation Techniques and Other Essential Skills (2013) and Battling Boredom (2010); Co-Author, 75 Quick and Easy Solutions to Common Classroom Disruptions (2012)

Carrie James, PhD, Research Director and Principal Investigator, Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education; Co-Author, "Nurturing Ethical Collaboration" (2016, Independent School Magazine) and "Young People, Ethics, and the New Digital Media" (2014, The MIT Press)

Chris Lehmann, MA, Founding Principal, Science Leadership Academy; Co-Author, Building School 2.0: How to Create the Schools We Need (2015); Co-Editor, What School Leaders Need to Know about Digital Technologies and Social Media (2011)

Daniel J. Levitin, PhD, FRSC, Professor of Psychology and Behavioral Neuroscience; Director of the Laboratory for Music Perception, Cognition and Expertise, McGill University; Author, The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload (2014), The World in Six Songs (2008) and This Is Your Brain On Music (2006)

Jennifer S. Light, PhD, Professor of Science, Technology and Society, Professor of Urban Studies and Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Co-Editor, From Voice to Influence: Understanding Citizenship in a Digital Age (2015)

Marilyn Price-Mitchell, PhD, Fellow, Institute for Social Innovation, Fielding Graduate University; Co-Founder, National ParentNet Association; Author, Tomorrow's Change Makers: Reclaiming the Power of Citizenship for a New Generation (2015) and "Empathy in Action: How Teachers Prepare Future Citizens" (2015, Edutopia)

K. Ann Renninger, PhD, Eugene M. Lang Research Professor and Department Chair, Swarthmore College; Co-Author, The Power of Interest for Motivation and Learning (2015); Co-Editor, Building Virtual Communities: Learning and Change in Cyberspace (2002)

Tony Wagner, PhD, Co-Director, Change Leadership Group, Harvard University Graduate School of Education; Author, The Global Achievement Gap: Why Even Our Best Schools Don’t Teach the New Survival Skills Our Children Need— And What We Can do About It (2009) and Making the Grade: Reinventing America’s Schools (2001); Co-Author, Change Leadership: A Practical Guide to Transforming Our Schools (2006)

Zoe Weil, MEd, Co-Founder and President, Institute for Humane Education; Author, The World Becomes What We Teach: Educating a Generation of Solutionaries (2016) and Above All, Be Kind: Raising a Humane Child in Challenging Times (2013)

Joel Westheimer, PhD, University Research Chair in Democracy and Education, University of Ottawa; Co-Founder and Executive Director, Democratic Dialogue; Author, What Kind of Citizen? Educating Our Children for the Common Good (2015) and Among School Teachers: Community, Autonomy and Ideology in Teachers' Work (1998)

Additional Information

WHO SHOULD ATTEND

  • Educators, Parents
  • Curriculum, Staff Developers
  • Speech-Language Pathologists
  • PreK-12 Teachers, Administrators
  • Learning Specialists, Special Educators
  • Psychologists, Social Workers, Counselors
  • Early Childhood Educators, Professionals
  • Reading, Writing, STEM, Civics Teachers
  • Superintendents, Principals, School Heads
  • Youth Empowerment, Mentoring Professionals
  • Civic, Community Engagement Advocates
  • College, Career Readiness Counselors
  • Researchers, University Professors

 

Featured Speakers:

Howard E. Gardner, PhD, John H. and Elizabeth A. Hobbs Professor of Cognition and Education, Harvard Graduate School of Education; Author, The Unschooled Mind (2011, 2nd edition) and Multiple Intelligences (2006); Co-Author, The App Generation (2013) and Good Work: When Excellence and Ethics Meet (2002)

Tony Wagner, PhD, Co-Director, Change Leadership Group, Harvard University Graduate School of Education; Author, The Global Achievement Gap: Why Even Our Best Schools Don’t Teach the New Survival Skills Our Children Need— And What We Can do About It (2009) and Making the Grade: Reinventing America’s Schools (2001); Co-Author, Change Leadership: A Practical Guide to Transforming Our Schools (2006)

Sandra B. Chapman, PhD, Founder and Chief Director of the Center for Brain health; Dee Wyly Distinguished CHair in Brain Health; Professor, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas; Co-Author, Make Your Brain Smarter: Increase Your Brain's Creativity, Energy and Focus (2013) and " Higher-order strategic gist reasoning in adolescence" (2013, The Adolescent Brain: Learning, Reasoning and Decision-Making)

 

Professional Development Credit: Earn 16-20 hours toward professional development credit for educators, psychologists, speech-language professionals and social workers. Visit our website at LearningAndTheBrain.com for more information on the availability of CEUs, PDPs, CEs and other professional development credit, or call 781-449-4010 ext. 104. Certificates of attendance and credit are free via email.

University Graduate Credit: You can earn three graduate level credits through the University of North Dakota. For details on the course and to register, visit LearningAndTheBrain.com.