Therapeutic Anitbodies 2003

Venue: The Hatton

Location: London, United Kingdom

Event Date/Time: Jun 23, 2003 End Date/Time: Jun 24, 2003
Registration Date: Jun 24, 2003
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Description

SMi’s 4th Annual conference

Therapeutic Antibodies 2003

23rd & 24th June 2003, The Hatton, London

Day One – 23rd June 2003

8.30 Registration & Coffee

9.00 Chairman's Opening Remarks
Dr Lutz Jermutus, Head, Display Technology Development, Cambridge Antibody Technology

ANTIBODY DISCOVERY

PRODUCTION METHODS
9.10 Structure-based approaches to engineering synthetic antibodies
 Identifying an antibody that binds to a disease-related antigen
 An insight into higher-affinity, higher-specificity and cross-reactive antibody engineering
 Advantages and disadvantages of different antibody formats
 Mapping functional binding eptitopes within antigen-binding sites
 Use of structural and sequence database for improved antibody engineering
 Identifying sequences required for correct antibody structure
Dr Sachdev Sidhu, Scientist, Genentech

LINKING ANTIBODY DISPLAY AND HIGH-THROUGHPUT SCREENING FOR THERAPEUTIC ANTIBODY DISCOVERY
9.40 High-throughput identification of functional antibodies
 Diverse display outputs and HT functional screening enhance the identification of therapeutic candidates
 Modifying display and HTS strategies to provide an effective lead isolation process
 Examples of HT screens used to obtain potent, specific leads with the desired biology
Dr Stephen Clulow, Director, Screening Technology, Cambridge Antibody Technology

XSTREAM
10.20 A functional proteomics approach towards the identification of novel drug targets and therapeutic antibody leads
 Chromophore-assisted laser inactivation (CALI) is an efficient protein knockout technology
 Selection of a scFv-phage display libraries against complex protein mixtures
 Combination of phage display, CALI and mass spectrometry results in a technology platform for the systematic identification and functional validation of novel drug targets
 Application example in cancer metastasis
Dr Gerald Beste, Director, Combinational Biology, Xerion Pharmaceuticals

11.00 Morning Coffee

DEVELOPMENT OF AN ULTRA POTENT ANTIBODY AGAINST RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS
11.20 Numax, a second generation of Synagis
 Systematic enhancement of binding kinetics (koff and kon)
 Correlation between binding kinetics and in vitro neutralization ability
 Epitope mapping
 In vivo potency (cotton rat animal model)
 Pharmacokinetics and tissue reactivity
 IND planning
Dr Herren Wu, Director, Protein Engineering & Structure, MedImmune

HUMAN MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES FOR TREATMENT AND PREVENTION OF VIRAL HEPATITIS
12.00 Clinical evaluation of human MAbs against HBV and HCV
 The development of drug evaluation systems: the in vitro cell-based assay and the Trimera model to assess effective therapies against HBV and HCV
 Evaluation and selection of neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies for treating viral hepatitis
 The Trimera mouse as a tool to generate fully human monoclonal antibodies with biological activity
 HepeX-B, a mixture of two human monoclonal antibodies in phase II clinical trials, treating chronic HBV patients in combination with Lamivudine
 HepeX-C, a monoclonal antibody to HCV in phase II clinical trials in HCV liver transplant patients to prevent re-infection
Dr Shlomo Dagan, Chief Scientific Officer, XTL Biopharmaceuticals

12.40 Networking Lunch

DERIVING ANTIBODY DRUGS FROM THE HUMAN GENOME
1.40 A look at antibody drugs from the human genome
 Use of genomic technologies to identify antibody targets
 HGS therapeutic antibody programs
- Lympho-Stat-B™, a human monoclonal antibody that neutralises B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS™) bioactivity
- Agonist antibodies against TRAIL receptors
Dr Vivian Albert, Executive Director, Antibody Development, Human Genome Sciences

SCREENING OF ANTIBODY LIBRARIES
2.20 The use of the FMAT technology for finding antibody fragments to cellular targets
 Screening of antibody fragments binding to expressed targets on living cells
 Antibody libraries as a source for finding binders to cellular targets
 FMAT screening of antibody fragments to surface targets on cells
Dr Johan Hallborn, Director, Antibody Discovery, BioInvent

ANTIBODY DISCOVERY
3.00 The power of complex libraries and display technologies
 New method of antibody library construction developed
 Examples of therapeutically relevant antibodies isolated from the libraries provided
 Cell-based selections
Dr Shana Frederickson, Senior Director, Antibody Discovery, Alexion Antibody Technologies

3.40 Afternoon Tea

DISPLAY TECHNOLOGIES
4.00 Discovery and development of human antibodies using an integrated phage and yeast platform
 Generating one or more phage libraries
 Screening the phage display libraries to select binding compounds with high affinity and high specificity to a target
 Producing and evaluating the selected binding compounds
 The diversity of libraries significantly improves the likelihood of identifying compounds with high specificity and high affinity
 The benefits of parallel screening
 The advantage of controlled binding and release
Dr René Hoet, Director, Research & Technology, Dyax

NOVEL CANCER ANTIGEN DISCOVERY FOR IMMUNOTHERAPY
4.40 Methods for antigen discovery and MAb development in a complex patent environment
 Conventional oncology antigens
 Requirements of novel antigens
 Antigen discovery methods
 MAb development
 The future of antigen-based cancer immunotherapy
Dr Jon Terrett, Director, Molecular Biology, Oxford GlycoSciences

5.20 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

Day Two - 24th June 2003

8.30 Re-registration & Coffee

9.00 Chairman's Opening Remarks
Dr Andrew Chapman, Head, BioProcess Research, Celltech

PRODUCTION

DOWNSTREAM PROCESSING OF RECOMBINANT ANTIBODIES
9.10 Current implications and strategies for the development of the downstream processing
 Development of DSP processes for large scale manufacturing
 Glycosylation of Ab in high producer cells
 Maintenance of product quality in DSP processing
 Technologies for large scale processing
Dr Joachim Walter, Head of Membrane Separation Sciences, Amersham Biosciences

RECOMBIANT DNA TECHNOLOGIES
9.40 A closer look into recombinant molecular engineering
 Development of platforms for genetic engineering
 Remodelling of plant cells for improved production of therapeutic recombinant proteins
 Introduction of new DNA regulatory elements (DRE’s)
 Improved yields of recombinant therapeutic proteins using cell culture platforms
Prof Jaap Goudsmit, Executive Vice President, Research & Development & Chief Scientific Officer, Crucell

DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL ANTIBODY FUSION PROTEINS
10.20 Proteins for large scale applications
 Identification and development of llama antibodies
 Application examples
 Development of novel fusion proteins for generic applications
Dr Neil Parry, Science Base Leader, Biosciences, Unilever

11.00 Morning Coffee

ALTERNATIVE APPROACHES TO DEVELOPING HIGHLY PRODUCTIVE CELL CULTURE PROCESSES FOR PRODUCING THERAPAUTIC PROTEINS
11.20 Unconventional techniques
 Key factors affecting productivity of cell culture processes
 Lonza Biologics' three successful alternative approaches to increase the productivity of mammalian cell culture processes
- Development of a robust fed-batch process by manipulation of the physiochemical environment
- Development of rapid screening protocols
- Development of extended cell life
Dr Jeremy Wayte, Principal Group Leader, Cell Culture Process Development, Lonza Biologics

12.00 Using the XenoMouse® technology for therapeutic product lead discovery
 Overview of the XenoMouse technology
 Product lead discovery at Abgenix
 Case studies
 Process sciences and manufacturing capabilities
Dr Larry Green, Director, Antibody Technologies, Abgenix

12.40 Networking Lunch

PRECLINICAL AND CLINICAL ISSUES

HIGH AFFINITY SINGLE DOMAIN ANTIBODIES FOR THERAPEUTIC APPLICATIONS
1.40 Combining the advantages of small molecule drugs and antibodies
 Characteristics of Ablynx’ single domain antibodies
 Large scale production
 Platform for discovering therapeutics
 Proteomics applications
Dr Hans de Haard, Director, Technology Development, Ablynx

BISPECIFIC T CELL ENGAGER (BiTEs)
2.20 An alternative to IgG1 for cancer therapy?
 IgG1 is a validated and commercially successful antibody format for cancer therapy
 Recruitment of cytotoxic T cells is not feasible with IgG1
 BiTEs can recruit and activate T cells
 BiTEs bypass mechanisms of regular T cell activation
 MT103 targeting CD19: a first BiTE in the clinic
 BiTEs can be developed for other targets
 Extreme potency of BiTEs will reduce production costs
Prof Dr Patrick Baeuerle, Chief Scientific Officer, Micromet

HERCEPTIN
3.00 Challenges in the clinical development of a monoclonal antibody for breast cancer
 Introduction to Herceptin
 Cardiotoxicity
 Pharmacokinetic challenges
 Diagnostics
 The challenge of targeted therapy: small patient populations = large clinical trial effort
Dr Claire Barton, Clinical Science Leader, Herceptin, Roche

3.40 Afternoon Tea

PRECLINICAL ISSUES ON DEVELOPMENT OF THERAPEUTIC ANTIBODIES
4.00 Similarities and differences to small molecule preclinical research and development
 Recent technological advances in production of therapeutic antibodies
 Preclinical development issues and potential solutions
 Example(s) of the development of a humanized monoclonal antibody
Dr Sharon Baughman, Director, Preclinical Development & Research, Amgen

ANTIBODY ENGINEERING USING YEAST DISPLAY TECHNOLOGY
4.40 Lessons learned and strategies for achieving optimum FACS sorting efficiencies
 Display technologies have proven to be valuable research and drug discovery tools
 Yeast display as a powerful new technology for protein and antibody engineering
 Yeast display to affinity maturate an scFv to sub-nanomolar affinity using yeast display in conjunction with high-speed fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)
 Optimizing yeast display library and sorting strategies by examining detection systems and FACS gating parameters
Michael Roguska, Group Leader, Biologics, Abbott Bioresearch

5.20 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

Venue

The Hatton
51-53 Hatton Gardens
London
United Kingdom
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Additional Information

For registration please contact Mali Cook on 0044 20 7827 6142 or email mcook@smi-online.co.uk.