BIOCHEMICAL SEPARATIONS: An Introduction to Laboratory Techniques in Biotechnology and Proteomics (BIOCHEMICAL SEPARATI)

Venue: Cook College, Rutgers University

Location: New Brunswick, New Jersey, United States

Event Date/Time: May 18, 2006 End Date/Time: May 19, 2006
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Description

This is an introductory-level course designed to acquaint participants with the wide range of modern techniques available for separating and purifying biomolecules. The fundamentals of each technique will be presented, including practical examples; however, sufficient theoretical background will be provided to enable the participants to understand how each technique functions. Emphasis will be placed on techniques used in protein isolation and purification-both from native and recombinant sources. The course will be particularly valuable to those who are beginning work in biochemistry and biotechnology laboratories and who wish to broaden their background in separation procedures used in biochemistry. "Biochemical Separations" may be useful for persons getting back into the laboratory after several years, for those between jobs, and for scientists whose job description now requires familiarity with separation techniques used in Proteomics.

Registration information and prices available
online @ http://www.rci.rutgers.edu/~crebb/biosep.html


Course Outline

Day 1
8:OOam-5:OOpm

Registration and Continental Breakfast

INTRODUCTION TO THE PROPERTIES OF BIOMOLECULES

Chemical and physical properties of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, lipids, and other biomolecules.
General strategies for molecular separations will be introduced.

PREPARATIVE METHODS

Survey of batch methods (salting out, isoelectric recipitation, and batch adsorption), dialysis, filtration, ultrafiltration.
Selected methods used in enzyme purification will be presented in detail.

Lunch

BASICS OF LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY OF BIOMOLECULES

Principles of liquid chromatography. Emphasis will be placed on modern methods of low pressure liquid chromatography including gel filtration chromatography. Elementary chromatographic theory will be introduced.


ION EXCHANGE AND HYDROPHOBIC INTERACTION CHROTOGRAPHY

A survey of ion exchange and hydrophobic (reverse phase) separation methods for proteins, nucleic acids and smaller molecules. Examples will include both high pressure and low pressure methods.

Day 2
8:OOam-5:OOpm

Continental Breakfast

AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

An introduction to this powerful method for purifying enzymes, antibodies, nucleic acids, and polysaccharides. Examples will include immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, and affinity chromatography of enzymes with immobilized substrate analogues. Separation of recombinant proteins will be emphasized.

CONTEMPORARY PRACTICE OF LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY (HPLC)

An overview of the basic operating principles of HPLC with a comparison to other available tools. Special emphasis will be placed on the role of modem liquid chromatography as a problem-solving tool for bioanalytical research.

Lunch

FUNDAMENTALS OF ELECTROPHORESIS

Basic principles of electrophoresis and survey of electrophoretic methods. Emphasis will be placed on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of proteins, molecular weight estimation by SDS PAGE, and isoelectric focusing

SEPARATION TECHNIQUES IN PROTEIN AND DNA SEQUENCING

Use of HPLC reverse phase chromatography in the sequencing of proteins by automated Edman degradation. Discussion of electrophoresis of nucleic acids as it applies to the sequencing of DNA.

Venue

Additional Information

The Center for Research and Education in Bioluminescence and Biotechnology (CREBB) The Center offers a series of continuing education workshops each year featuring nationally renowned presenters. The Center for Research and Education in Bioluminescence and Biotechnology (CREBB) is a component of Rutgers University, Cook College. The CREBB mission is to perform basic research on bioluminescence and to utilize bioluminescence (especially the Green-Fluorescent Protein) as a tool to educate the scientific and industrial communities in the field of biotechnology. Faculty Coordinator Dr. William W. Ward Associate Professor of Biochemistry Cook College, Rutgers University and Director of C.R.E.B.B. Dr. Ward is a noted teacher and seminar leader with more than 15 years of experience with adult professional audiences. He specializes in the chemical and physical properties of the green-fluorescent protein and other proteins involved in marine bioluminescence. Dr. Ward also teaches "Fluorescence: Basic Principles and Applications in Drug Discovery" for IBC Life Sciences Training Academy. Dr. Ward has just co-authored (with Catherine Thomson, Ph.D.) "A Guide to Green-Fluorescent Protein: Applications in Cell Biology and Drug Discovery" for D&MD Publications. This resourse-oriented practical guide presents an overview of the most important features and technological applications of Green-Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and its variant forms, and illustrates how GFP is currently being used in the biopharmaceutical industry. D&MD Publishing is happy to extend a 10% discount to the registrants of the Protein Purification course and Biochemical Separations course. When ordering this Guide, please mention source code "9133-10%PP". To order the Guide, please contact D&MD's Customer Service Department at cust.serv@drugandmarket.com or call (508)616-5566.

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