Patient Safety Summit (Patient Safety)

Venue: Chicago

Location: Chicago, Illinois, United States

Event Date/Time: Jul 26, 2007 End Date/Time: Jul 27, 2007
Registration Date: Jul 24, 2007
Early Registration Date: Jun 12, 2007
Report as Spam

Description

“Improving quality and patient safety continue to be primary health industry goals...health information technology adoption is
foundational to achievement of such quality, patient safety and necessary clinical process improvements.”
-George (Buddy) Hickman, HIMSS Board Chair
An exclusive, Two-Day Industry Summit designed to provide participants an interactive opportunity to learn
about the latest in patient safety from the nation’s most notable experts on patient safety and quality.
Mark Callahan, M.D.
NEW YORK PRESBYTERIAN HEALTHCARE NETWORK
Eric Thomas, M.D., M.P.H.
UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS MEDICAL SCHOOL AT HOUSTON
Annette Ayers, RN, BSN, MHA, Vice President Patient Services
PROVIDENCE HEALTH CENTER
Melissa Rains, RN, BSN, MSN, Director Quality Management
PROVIDENCE HEALTH CENTER
Lucian L. Leape, M.D., Adjutant Professor of Health Policy
HARVARD SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
Joseph Britto, MD, CEO & Co-Founder, ISABEL HEALTHCARE, INC.
John Reiling, M.H.A, M.B.A, President and Chief Executive Offi cer
(CEO), ST. JOSEPH’S COMMUNITY HOSPITAL
Nathaniel M. Simms, MD, Physician Advisor, Partners Healthcare
Biomedical Engineering, MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL
Frank M. Houser, MD, Senior Vice President for Quality & Medical
Director, HCA
Fred Heigel, Director,
NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
Scott Williams, M.D., Deputy Director
UTAH DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
Shannon Sayles, Director of Safety & Performance Excellence
SENTARA HEALTHCARE
John Brehm, M.D., F.A.C.P., Chief Medical Offi cer
WEST VIRGINIA MEDICAL INSTITUTE
Paul F. Conlon, Pharm.D., J.D.,Vice President, Clinical Quality
TRINITY
This conference will share the experience of senior leaders who have addressed Patient safety and quality as a strategic imperative
within their organizations. Including representatives from:
This conference will demonstrate what your organization can do to ensure that patients are not harmed by the very care systems
they trust will heal them. Key issues to be covered include:
• Leading-Edge Approaches to Improving Healthcare Quality and Safety
• Practical approaches, tools and methods which create and foster engagement, teamwork and collaboration.
• Providing a comprehensive view of medication and device safety across the continuum of care
• Implementing new technologies: The common pitfalls of technology implementation and how to avoid them.
• Implementing a Patient Safety Program: Infusing safety and healthcare quality into the company culture
• Identifying and managing the sources of error in healthcare
• Improving the patient’s perception of safety for more positive patient outcomes and experiences
• Strategies and methods to improve the accuracy of patient identifi cation
• Keys to communication hand-offs and briefi ngs
• Improve the safety of using medications: reconcile medications across the continuum of care
And Many More...
MEDIA PARTNERS:
Active Communications International Nicole Semrau Phone: 414-221-1700 Fax: 414-221-1900 www.acius.
Day One, Thursday, July 26, 2007
8:00AM-8:30AM REGISTRATION AND BREAKFAST
8:30AM- 9:00AM WELCOME AND OPENING REMARKS FROM THE CHAIR
9:00AM-10:00AM DEVELOPING A PATIENT-SAFETY CULTURE
While data collection, reporting and analysis, and establishing new processes and procedures for reducing medical error and improving patient
safety are important, little progress can be achieved without developing a culture within and across health care institutions, providers, and patients
that embraces and emphasizes the importance of patient safety. Three presenters shared insights about the issues, tools and strategies for making
this happen:
Dr. Mark Callahan emphasized that physicians and hospital administration leadership is key to the development of a patient safety-focused
organization. He identifi ed a number of promising approaches to engage physicians and other senior decision-makers, including:
• Consider fi nancial incentives and rewards to infl uence behavior.
• Reexamine and reform the licensing and tort laws, which inhibit open communication.
• Work with early adopters and clinical champions.
• Fund open demonstration projects designed to decrease medical errors and improve patient safety.
• Establish a State-wide error reporting system that is used to promote quality improvement rather than one that is focused on punitive sanctions.
Mark Callahan, M.D., NEW YORK PRESBYTERIAN HEALTHCARE NETWORK
Eric Thomas, M.D., M.P.H., UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS MEDICAL SCHOOL AT HOUSTON
10:00AM-10:30AM MORNING REFRESHMENTS AND NETWORKING BREAK
10:30AM-11:15PM DELIVER EXCEPTIONAL CUSTOMER SERVICE TO INCREASE PATIENT SAFETY AND SATISFACTION
Customer service is a nucleus and the driving success for achieving high quality of care and patient safety in your orthopedic center. However, the
challenge is how to keep your customer service program momentum and create a commitment that does not go away. This session addresses
how to develop and implement a structure supported by a philosophy of safe patient care and the initiatives undertaken to improve outcomes for all
patients, including joint patients.
• Develop protocols and the level of cooperation from the physicians and staff
• Implement a program in key departments of musculoskeletal service
• Expand a program to other areas of care and departments
• Create a difference by providing patient centered care in a safe environment
Annette Ayers, RN, BSN, MHA, Vice President Patient Services, PROVIDENCE HEALTH CENTER
Melissa Rains, RN, BSN, MSN, Director Quality Management, PROVIDENCE HEALTH CENTER
11:15PM-12:00PM DIAGNOSIS ERROR: INCIDENCE, CONTRIBUTORY FACTORS AND SOLUTIONS
• How much of medical error is diagnosis error?
• What are the factors that contribute to diagnosis error?
• Diagnosis decision support systems: the next generation
• Validation of diagnosis decision support systems
• Integrating EMR systems with diagnosis decision support systems
• What are the drivers for adoption of diagnosis decision support systems?
Joseph Britto, MD, CEO & Co-Founder, ISABEL HEALTHCARE, INC.
12:00AM-1:15PM NETWORKING LUNCHEON FOR DELEGATES & SPEAKERS
1:15PM-2:15PM IMPROVED PATIENT SAFETY: AN INNOVATIVE APPROACH
St. Joseph’s Community Hospital in West Bend, Wisconsin, is building a new hospital using patient safety as a core design consideration. This
approach offers helpful insights and lessons for States as they plan for future capital investments.
CEO John Reiling recounted how the planning process—which included a “learning lab” made up of leading national, regional and
State patient safety experts brainstorming on how best to develop a safe hospital—provided valuable feedback to architects on design
requirements for the facility.
Active Communications International Nicole Semrau Phone: 414-221-1700 Fax: 414-221-1900 www.acius.net
Some of the new design features include patient rooms that are identical rather than mirror images of each other, an anteroom with a metal
detector to prevent staff or patients from bringing metal objects into the MRI room, and sinks placed in view of the patients, so they can observe
whether the health care staff wash their hands before treating them in their rooms.
John Reiling, M.H.A, M.B.A, President and Chief Executive Offi cer (CEO), ST. JOSEPH’S COMMUNITY HOSPITAL
2:15PM-3:15PM SMART BEDSIDE DEVICES, AUTO-ID AND ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORDS
In the past few years, healthcare organizations have been focusing on islands of technology. Dr. Sims will share his vision of how merging data
streams from various sources, including medical devices, into an electronic health record can take healthcare towards greater productivity and safety.
Nathaniel M. Simms, MD, Physician Advisor, Partners Healthcare Biomedical Engineering, MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL
3:15PM-3:30PM AFTERNOON NETWORKING BREAK AND REFRESHMENTS
3:30PM-4:30-PM ENHANCING PATIENT SAFETY WITH RFID TRACKING
This presentation will detail how hospitals can utilize RFID tracking and techniques to dramatically reduce medical errors and enhance patient
safety.
James D. Fonger, M.D., Adult Cardiothoracic Surgery
4:30PM-5:00PM CHAIRPERSON’S CLOSING COMMENTS
5:00PM CLOSE OF DAY ONE
Day Two, Friday, JULY 27, 2007
8:00AM-8:30AM CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST
8:30AM-9:00AM RECAP OF DAY ONE AND OPENING COMMENTS
9:00AM-10:00AM CONSUMERS AND HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: IMPLICATIONS FOR PATIENT SAFETY
This presentation will address the important role of consumers in the development of patient safety solutions, including those facilitated by
and resulting from advancements being made in healthcare information technology. Innovative approaches in HIT can be compromised by
implementation issues, some driven by lack of patient buy-in to both new technologies and those that are rapidly becoming standard in the
healthcare industry. The potential role of PHRs in reducing medical error and improving safety will be discussed, as will the importance of
responsiveness to consumer issues, which include security, privacy and consumers’ desire to retain control of their own information. Furthermore,
this presentation will comment on signifi cant phases in the development of PHRs where consumer involvement is vital, including policy, regulation
setting and product design.
Lucian L. Leape, M.D., Adjutant Professor of Health Policy
HARVARD SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
10:00AM-10:30AM MORNING REFRESHMENTS AND NETWORKING BREAK
10:30AM-11:15AM DEVELOPING PATIENT SAFETY INITIATIVE IN COMMUNITY HOSPITALS
HCA developed its Patient Safety effort to help reduce medical errors in its nearly 200 hospitals. The extensive project has focused on reducing
medication errors, but has expanded to include initiatives to reduce errors in HCA’s emergency departments, obstetrical units, and surgical
services departments. In 2003, HCA’s Patient Safety effort will expand to develop strategies to reduce hospital-acquired infections.
This presentation will focus on the company’s efforts to develop and implement two technology systems to reduce medication errors:
• eMAR is HCA’s name for its imitative to utilize bar coding technology to decrease errors at the bedside during medication administration.
The eMar project is currently deployed throughout 15 HCA hospitals.
• ePOM is HCA’s name for its computerized physician order entry system
Frank M. Houser, MD, Senior Vice President for Quality & Medical Director, HCA
Active Communications International Nicole Semrau Phone: 414-221-1700 Fax: 414-221-1900 www.acius.
11:15AM-12:00PM STATE REPORTING: ISSUES & ACTIVITIES
Approximately 20 States have established systems for reporting medical errors. Some of these reporting systems are voluntary in nature; others
require the reporting of certain medical errors to the State. Critical to improving patient safety in health care settings, these systems also provide a
mechanism that allows facilities to generate a database to track and compare trends over a period of time.
Two different State reporting systems will be discussed in some detail, including:
• The New York Patient Occurrence Reporting and Tracking System (NYPORTS) is a mandatory adverse event reporting system that
collects information on 54 reportable occurrence categories.
• The Utah Department of Health (DOH) used an administrative rule in the DOH statutory authority to establish a reporting system that
uses data already collected to focus on sentinel adverse events and adverse drug reactions.
Fred Heigel, Director, NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
Scott Williams, M.D., Deputy Director, UTAH DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
12:00AM-1:15PM NETWORKING LUNCHEON FOR DELEGATES & SPEAKERS
1:15PM-2:15PM BUILD AND SUSTAIN A CULTURE OF SAFETY FOR YOUR SERVICES AND PROGRAMS
This keynote describes and provides a comprehensive approach to building a culture of safety based on strategies proven successful in nuclear
power and other high-risk industries. Beginning with information on how to develop a basic understanding of human performance philosophy,
the program will show how a healthcare organization can translate this understanding into creating effective safety cultures in the healthcare
environment to achieve reductions in errors and events. Specifi c strategies reviewed will include
• Develop behavior expectations for error prevention
• Implement Red Rules for safety
• Simplify work processes
• Establish effective cause analysis of events
• Build effective accountability systems
Shannon Sayles, Director of Safety & Performance Excellence, Sentara Healthcare
2:15PM-3:15PM THE CULTURE OF SAFETY: CLINICAL KNOWLEDGE AND EVEN THE RIGHT IT AREN’T ENOUGH TO
GUARANTEE PATIENT SAFETY
The West Virginia Medical Institute (WVMI) is a not-for-profi t organization of more than 300 professionals who work with health plans, providers
and consumers toward quality improvement in healthcare. WVMI researchers have discovered that clinical knowledge is not always the answer to
our most pressing healthcare problems. Many times we have the knowledge, but we are missing the processes.
Does the hospital have the processes in place to ensure that patients receive appropriate treatment? Caregivers, even when they have a patient
record, sometimes believe that beta-blockers were administered even when they were not. Only careful review of charts may show that standards
were not followed. This is a situation of knowledge versus process: The caregiver knows the beta-blocker could have saved a life, and this
knowledge prevents him from believing that no process was in place to ensure the use of beta-blockers.
John Brehm, M.D., F.A.C.P., Chief Medical Offi cer, WEST VIRGINIA MEDICAL INSTITUTE
3:15PM-3:30PM AFTERNOON REFRESHMENT BREAK AND EXHIBITS
3:30PM-4:45PM CLOSING PANEL DISCUSSION: CURRENT STATE OF PATIENT SAFETY
This interactive panel discussion features a risk manager of a large hospital and the Director of Clinical Quality for a large consortium of hospitals
addressing their experiences with encouraging reporting of adverse events within their institutions. They will describe the reporting burden
encountered when events must be reported outside the institution to several different organizations.
4:45PM-5:00PM CHAIRPERSON’S CLOSING
5:00PM CLOSE OF CONFERENCE
1:15PM-2:15PM BUILD AND SUSTAIN A CULTURE OF SAFETY FOR YOUR SERVICES AND PROGRAMS
Active Communications International Nicole Semrau Phone: 414-221-1700 Fax: 414-221-1900 www.acius.net
CONFERENCE VENUE
Conference Fee: $1,995 Conference Documentation CD: $615
Special Vendor Registration Price: $2,390
(Documentation CD includes copies of all proceedings on CD and shipping is included)
REGISTER 3 & GET 1 FREE!
Any organization registering three persons at the same time will be entitled to a fourth registrant FREE of charge!
PAYMENT: ACI must recieve payment 5 days after
receiving booking form.
WHO WILL ATTEND
CIOs, CMOs, Presidents, CEOs, COOs and CFOs, Patient Safety Leaders,
Quality Offi cers, Healthcare Executives, Clinical Leadership, Frontline Workers,
Patient Safety Offi cers, Risk Managers, Academics, Public Policy Professionals
ALSO:
IT, Pharmacy, Nursing, Case Management, Quality Improvement, Materials
Management, Purchasing and biomedical engineering staff
FROM:
Hospitals, Integrated Delivery Networks, Health Plans, Insurance Companies
and Physician Groups.
“Improving quality and patient safety continue to be primary health industry goals...health information technology adoption is
foundational to achievement of such quality, patient safety and necessary clinical process improvements.”
-George (Buddy) Hickman, HIMSS Board Chair
An exclusive, Two-Day Industry Summit designed to provide participants an interactive opportunity to learn
about the latest in patient safety from the nation’s most notable experts on patient safety and quality.
Mark Callahan, M.D.
NEW YORK PRESBYTERIAN HEALTHCARE NETWORK
Eric Thomas, M.D., M.P.H.
UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS MEDICAL SCHOOL AT HOUSTON
Annette Ayers, RN, BSN, MHA, Vice President Patient Services
PROVIDENCE HEALTH CENTER
Melissa Rains, RN, BSN, MSN, Director Quality Management
PROVIDENCE HEALTH CENTER
Lucian L. Leape, M.D., Adjutant Professor of Health Policy
HARVARD SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
Joseph Britto, MD, CEO & Co-Founder, ISABEL HEALTHCARE, INC.
John Reiling, M.H.A, M.B.A, President and Chief Executive Offi cer
(CEO), ST. JOSEPH’S COMMUNITY HOSPITAL
Nathaniel M. Simms, MD, Physician Advisor, Partners Healthcare
Biomedical Engineering, MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL
Frank M. Houser, MD, Senior Vice President for Quality & Medical
Director, HCA
Fred Heigel, Director,
NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
Scott Williams, M.D., Deputy Director
UTAH DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
Shannon Sayles, Director of Safety & Performance Excellence
SENTARA HEALTHCARE
John Brehm, M.D., F.A.C.P., Chief Medical Offi cer
WEST VIRGINIA MEDICAL INSTITUTE
Paul F. Conlon, Pharm.D., J.D.,Vice President, Clinical Quality
TRINITY
This conference will share the experience of senior leaders who have addressed Patient safety and quality as a strategic imperative
within their organizations. Including representatives from:
This conference will demonstrate what your organization can do to ensure that patients are not harmed by the very care systems
they trust will heal them. Key issues to be covered include:
• Leading-Edge Approaches to Improving Healthcare Quality and Safety
• Practical approaches, tools and methods which create and foster engagement, teamwork and collaboration.
• Providing a comprehensive view of medication and device safety across the continuum of care
• Implementing new technologies: The common pitfalls of technology implementation and how to avoid them.
• Implementing a Patient Safety Program: Infusing safety and healthcare quality into the company culture
• Identifying and managing the sources of error in healthcare
• Improving the patient’s perception of safety for more positive patient outcomes and experiences
• Strategies and methods to improve the accuracy of patient identifi cation
• Keys to communication hand-offs and briefi ngs
• Improve the safety of using medications: reconcile medications across the continuum of care
And Many More...
MEDIA PARTNERS:
Active Communications International Nicole Semrau Phone: 414-221-1700 Fax: 414-221-1900 www.acius.
Day One, Thursday, July 26, 2007
8:00AM-8:30AM REGISTRATION AND BREAKFAST
8:30AM- 9:00AM WELCOME AND OPENING REMARKS FROM THE CHAIR
9:00AM-10:00AM DEVELOPING A PATIENT-SAFETY CULTURE
While data collection, reporting and analysis, and establishing new processes and procedures for reducing medical error and improving patient
safety are important, little progress can be achieved without developing a culture within and across health care institutions, providers, and patients
that embraces and emphasizes the importance of patient safety. Three presenters shared insights about the issues, tools and strategies for making
this happen:
Dr. Mark Callahan emphasized that physicians and hospital administration leadership is key to the development of a patient safety-focused
organization. He identifi ed a number of promising approaches to engage physicians and other senior decision-makers, including:
• Consider fi nancial incentives and rewards to infl uence behavior.
• Reexamine and reform the licensing and tort laws, which inhibit open communication.
• Work with early adopters and clinical champions.
• Fund open demonstration projects designed to decrease medical errors and improve patient safety.
• Establish a State-wide error reporting system that is used to promote quality improvement rather than one that is focused on punitive sanctions.
Mark Callahan, M.D., NEW YORK PRESBYTERIAN HEALTHCARE NETWORK
Eric Thomas, M.D., M.P.H., UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS MEDICAL SCHOOL AT HOUSTON
10:00AM-10:30AM MORNING REFRESHMENTS AND NETWORKING BREAK
10:30AM-11:15PM DELIVER EXCEPTIONAL CUSTOMER SERVICE TO INCREASE PATIENT SAFETY AND SATISFACTION
Customer service is a nucleus and the driving success for achieving high quality of care and patient safety in your orthopedic center. However, the
challenge is how to keep your customer service program momentum and create a commitment that does not go away. This session addresses
how to develop and implement a structure supported by a philosophy of safe patient care and the initiatives undertaken to improve outcomes for all
patients, including joint patients.
• Develop protocols and the level of cooperation from the physicians and staff
• Implement a program in key departments of musculoskeletal service
• Expand a program to other areas of care and departments
• Create a difference by providing patient centered care in a safe environment
Annette Ayers, RN, BSN, MHA, Vice President Patient Services, PROVIDENCE HEALTH CENTER
Melissa Rains, RN, BSN, MSN, Director Quality Management, PROVIDENCE HEALTH CENTER
11:15PM-12:00PM DIAGNOSIS ERROR: INCIDENCE, CONTRIBUTORY FACTORS AND SOLUTIONS
• How much of medical error is diagnosis error?
• What are the factors that contribute to diagnosis error?
• Diagnosis decision support systems: the next generation
• Validation of diagnosis decision support systems
• Integrating EMR systems with diagnosis decision support systems
• What are the drivers for adoption of diagnosis decision support systems?
Joseph Britto, MD, CEO & Co-Founder, ISABEL HEALTHCARE, INC.
12:00AM-1:15PM NETWORKING LUNCHEON FOR DELEGATES & SPEAKERS
1:15PM-2:15PM IMPROVED PATIENT SAFETY: AN INNOVATIVE APPROACH
St. Joseph’s Community Hospital in West Bend, Wisconsin, is building a new hospital using patient safety as a core design consideration. This
approach offers helpful insights and lessons for States as they plan for future capital investments.
CEO John Reiling recounted how the planning process—which included a “learning lab” made up of leading national, regional and
State patient safety experts brainstorming on how best to develop a safe hospital—provided valuable feedback to architects on design
requirements for the facility.
Active Communications International Nicole Semrau Phone: 414-221-1700 Fax: 414-221-1900 www.acius.net
Some of the new design features include patient rooms that are identical rather than mirror images of each other, an anteroom with a metal
detector to prevent staff or patients from bringing metal objects into the MRI room, and sinks placed in view of the patients, so they can observe
whether the health care staff wash their hands before treating them in their rooms.
John Reiling, M.H.A, M.B.A, President and Chief Executive Offi cer (CEO), ST. JOSEPH’S COMMUNITY HOSPITAL
2:15PM-3:15PM SMART BEDSIDE DEVICES, AUTO-ID AND ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORDS
In the past few years, healthcare organizations have been focusing on islands of technology. Dr. Sims will share his vision of how merging data
streams from various sources, including medical devices, into an electronic health record can take healthcare towards greater productivity and safety.
Nathaniel M. Simms, MD, Physician Advisor, Partners Healthcare Biomedical Engineering, MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL
3:15PM-3:30PM AFTERNOON NETWORKING BREAK AND REFRESHMENTS
3:30PM-4:30-PM ENHANCING PATIENT SAFETY WITH RFID TRACKING
This presentation will detail how hospitals can utilize RFID tracking and techniques to dramatically reduce medical errors and enhance patient
safety.
James D. Fonger, M.D., Adult Cardiothoracic Surgery
4:30PM-5:00PM CHAIRPERSON’S CLOSING COMMENTS
5:00PM CLOSE OF DAY ONE
Day Two, Friday, JULY 27, 2007
8:00AM-8:30AM CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST
8:30AM-9:00AM RECAP OF DAY ONE AND OPENING COMMENTS
9:00AM-10:00AM CONSUMERS AND HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: IMPLICATIONS FOR PATIENT SAFETY
This presentation will address the important role of consumers in the development of patient safety solutions, including those facilitated by
and resulting from advancements being made in healthcare information technology. Innovative approaches in HIT can be compromised by
implementation issues, some driven by lack of patient buy-in to both new technologies and those that are rapidly becoming standard in the
healthcare industry. The potential role of PHRs in reducing medical error and improving safety will be discussed, as will the importance of
responsiveness to consumer issues, which include security, privacy and consumers’ desire to retain control of their own information. Furthermore,
this presentation will comment on signifi cant phases in the development of PHRs where consumer involvement is vital, including policy, regulation
setting and product design.
Lucian L. Leape, M.D., Adjutant Professor of Health Policy
HARVARD SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
10:00AM-10:30AM MORNING REFRESHMENTS AND NETWORKING BREAK
10:30AM-11:15AM DEVELOPING PATIENT SAFETY INITIATIVE IN COMMUNITY HOSPITALS
HCA developed its Patient Safety effort to help reduce medical errors in its nearly 200 hospitals. The extensive project has focused on reducing
medication errors, but has expanded to include initiatives to reduce errors in HCA’s emergency departments, obstetrical units, and surgical
services departments. In 2003, HCA’s Patient Safety effort will expand to develop strategies to reduce hospital-acquired infections.
This presentation will focus on the company’s efforts to develop and implement two technology systems to reduce medication errors:
• eMAR is HCA’s name for its imitative to utilize bar coding technology to decrease errors at the bedside during medication administration.
The eMar project is currently deployed throughout 15 HCA hospitals.
• ePOM is HCA’s name for its computerized physician order entry system
Frank M. Houser, MD, Senior Vice President for Quality & Medical Director, HCA
Active Communications International Nicole Semrau Phone: 414-221-1700 Fax: 414-221-1900 www.acius.
11:15AM-12:00PM STATE REPORTING: ISSUES & ACTIVITIES
Approximately 20 States have established systems for reporting medical errors. Some of these reporting systems are voluntary in nature; others
require the reporting of certain medical errors to the State. Critical to improving patient safety in health care settings, these systems also provide a
mechanism that allows facilities to generate a database to track and compare trends over a period of time.
Two different State reporting systems will be discussed in some detail, including:
• The New York Patient Occurrence Reporting and Tracking System (NYPORTS) is a mandatory adverse event reporting system that
collects information on 54 reportable occurrence categories.
• The Utah Department of Health (DOH) used an administrative rule in the DOH statutory authority to establish a reporting system that
uses data already collected to focus on sentinel adverse events and adverse drug reactions.
Fred Heigel, Director, NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
Scott Williams, M.D., Deputy Director, UTAH DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
12:00AM-1:15PM NETWORKING LUNCHEON FOR DELEGATES & SPEAKERS
1:15PM-2:15PM BUILD AND SUSTAIN A CULTURE OF SAFETY FOR YOUR SERVICES AND PROGRAMS
This keynote describes and provides a comprehensive approach to building a culture of safety based on strategies proven successful in nuclear
power and other high-risk industries. Beginning with information on how to develop a basic understanding of human performance philosophy,
the program will show how a healthcare organization can translate this understanding into creating effective safety cultures in the healthcare
environment to achieve reductions in errors and events. Specifi c strategies reviewed will include
• Develop behavior expectations for error prevention
• Implement Red Rules for safety
• Simplify work processes
• Establish effective cause analysis of events
• Build effective accountability systems
Shannon Sayles, Director of Safety & Performance Excellence, Sentara Healthcare
2:15PM-3:15PM THE CULTURE OF SAFETY: CLINICAL KNOWLEDGE AND EVEN THE RIGHT IT AREN’T ENOUGH TO
GUARANTEE PATIENT SAFETY
The West Virginia Medical Institute (WVMI) is a not-for-profi t organization of more than 300 professionals who work with health plans, providers
and consumers toward quality improvement in healthcare. WVMI researchers have discovered that clinical knowledge is not always the answer to
our most pressing healthcare problems. Many times we have the knowledge, but we are missing the processes.
Does the hospital have the processes in place to ensure that patients receive appropriate treatment? Caregivers, even when they have a patient
record, sometimes believe that beta-blockers were administered even when they were not. Only careful review of charts may show that standards
were not followed. This is a situation of knowledge versus process: The caregiver knows the beta-blocker could have saved a life, and this
knowledge prevents him from believing that no process was in place to ensure the use of beta-blockers.
John Brehm, M.D., F.A.C.P., Chief Medical Offi cer, WEST VIRGINIA MEDICAL INSTITUTE
3:15PM-3:30PM AFTERNOON REFRESHMENT BREAK AND EXHIBITS
3:30PM-4:45PM CLOSING PANEL DISCUSSION: CURRENT STATE OF PATIENT SAFETY
This interactive panel discussion features a risk manager of a large hospital and the Director of Clinical Quality for a large consortium of hospitals
addressing their experiences with encouraging reporting of adverse events within their institutions. They will describe the reporting burden
encountered when events must be reported outside the institution to several different organizations.
4:45PM-5:00PM CHAIRPERSON’S CLOSING
5:00PM CLOSE OF CONFERENCE
1:15PM-2:15PM BUILD AND SUSTAIN A CULTURE OF SAFETY FOR YOUR SERVICES AND PROGRAMS
Active Communications International Nicole Semrau Phone: 414-221-1700 Fax: 414-221-1900 www.acius.net

WHO WILL ATTEND
CIOs, CMOs, Presidents, CEOs, COOs and CFOs, Patient Safety Leaders,
Quality Offi cers, Healthcare Executives, Clinical Leadership, Frontline Workers,
Patient Safety Offi cers, Risk Managers, Academics, Public Policy Professionals
ALSO:
IT, Pharmacy, Nursing, Case Management, Quality Improvement, Materials
Management, Purchasing and biomedical engineering staff
FROM:
Hospitals, Integrated Delivery Networks, Health Plans, Insurance Companies
and Physician Groups.

Venue

Additional Information

Active Communications International Nicole Semrau Phone: 414-221-1700 Fax: 414-221-1900 www.acius.net Conference Fee: $1,995 Conference Documentation CD: $615 Special Vendor Registration Price: $2,390 (Documentation CD includes copies of all proceedings on CD and shipping is included) REGISTER 3 & GET 1 FREE! Any organization registering three persons at the same time will be entitled to a fourth registrant FREE of charge! PAYMENT: ACI must recieve payment 5 days after receiving booking form.