4th National India Roads Conference 2011- Road Safety (SafetyIndRdConf2011)

Venue: New Delhi, India

Location: New Delhi, India

Event Date/Time: Jun 29, 2011 End Date/Time: Jun 30, 2011
Registration Date: Jun 27, 2011
Early Registration Date: Jun 01, 2011
Abstract Submission Date: May 30, 2011
Paper Submission Date: May 30, 2011
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Description

Conference will include the elements in road safety that need to be
considered from an infrastructure perspective, particularly:
- Technology of road surfaces: striking a balance between cost and safety, comparative analysis of bitumen and concrete from safety parameters
- Design, standards, maintenance contracts, auditing
- Legal and institutional framework for road safety

Venue

Additional Information

About the 4th National India Roads Conference

 

4th National India Roads Conference

 

Relevance

The UN General Assembly has passed a resolution proclaiming a Decade of Action for Road Safety 2011-2020, which aims to save lives by halting the increasing trends in road traffic deaths and injuries world-wide. India has the highest annual road death toll, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO). More than 130,000 people die each year across the country in crashes caused by speeding, bad roads, overcrowding and poor vehicle maintenance and a million get maimed. This amounts to nearly 3% GDP loss.

 

In India, road safety has finally found its way to the Parliament. A Bill will be introduced in the Rajya Sabha this season for a final go-ahead to the National Road Safety and Traffic Management Board Bill, 2010. This bill is founded on the report of a committee on road safety and traffic management, which was set up under the chairmanship of Mr. Sanjivi Sundar, Distinguished Fellow, The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI), Former Secretary, Ministry of Surface Transport, Government of India.

 

Mr. Sundar will be the Conference Chair of the 4th National India Roads Conference 2011.

 

About the conference

4th National India Roads Conference will include the elements in road safety that need to be considered from an infrastructure perspective, particularly:

 

§         Technology of road surfaces: striking a balance between cost and safety, comparative analysis of bitumen and concrete from safety parameters

§         Design, standards, maintenance contracts, auditing

§         Legal and institutional framework for road safety

 

Conference Chair: Mr. Sanjivi Sundar

§         Chairman, Sundar Committee Report on Road Safety and Traffic Management, Ministry of Road Transport and Highways, Government of India

§         Distinguished Fellow, The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI)

§         Former Secretary, Ministry of Surface Transport, Government of India

 

Key subjects

§         Analysis of Sundar Committee Report and Road Safety Bill

§         Strengthening physical infrastructure for road safety

§         Minimum safety standards for design, construction and operation

§         Building safety and efficiency through material, design and construction

§         The implementation syndrome: Applying safety standards

§         Road safety audits

§         Cost-effective solutions in road safety implementation

§         Business opportunities in road safety

§         Role of education and training in building awareness

§         Case studies in building safe road infrastructure

 

Key takeaways

§         Understanding of Road Safety Bill 2010

§         Updates on latest technology in road construction

§         How toplines and bottomlines work in road safety

§         Understanding of trends and current strategies

§         What to expect in policy and regulation

§         International benchmarks

§         Business opportunities in road safety

 

Our conference will make efforts to address questions that have emerged in road safety;

§         What methods is the government adopting to reduce road accidents?

§         Agencies like NHTSA in USA and SNRA in Sweden have the power and budgets to plan and implement road safety programmes, and are identified as the most successful models for ensuring road safety. Can India have such a self-sustaining body?

§         The 57th WHO Assembly recommended to member states to explore the possibilities to increase funding for road safety, including through the creation of a fund. How should India take this initiative?

§         The Committee on Infrastructure had decided that one per cent of the cess accruing to the National highways should be employed to create a National Road Safety Fund. How will the funds be utilised? Is one per cent a good enough amount to address safety requirements completely?

§         What quantum of funds would be required for the Road Safety Act to be implemented for engineering, legal, maintenance and awareness purposes?

§         Are our BOT contracts cutting safety corners? What elements would you bring into our contracts to ensure that our accident rate goes down below the current 14 per 10,000?

§         Are we using the most effective road designs for our country? What are they? How are they uniquely designed for India?

§         Do we have risk analysis and assessment of safety impacts mechanisms? What are such mechanisms we should be using?

§         What opportunities are available and emerging in road safety?

 

Format

Our conference is headed by a Conference Chair, an eminent personality connected with the policymaking sphere relating to the industry. The Chair, along with Session Chairs, leads and summarizes the conference’s key points, and makes recommendations to policymakers and the industry.

 

ASAPP Conferences believes that interactivity at conferences results in better spread of understanding ground issues as well as in involving our delegates in discussions in regards to operations, technology and policy. Such interactivity also helps in evolving critical issues and taking them further in the form of recommendations. Consequently, the conference is replete with panel discussions, often involving delegate participation, and exhaustive Q&A sessions.

 

A typical session opens with the Session Chair’s lengthy introduction to the session’s main subject. This is followed by related addresses by the panelists in that session, a panel discussion, and Q&A. The session concludes with a comprehensive summary by the Session Chair.

 

Our typical conference includes two coffee breaks and a lunch break during the day, allowing plenty of time for business and professional networking opportunities among attendees.

 

To know more visit www.indiaroadconference.com

 

 

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